How to Nudge Your Customers Without Pushing Them Away

Featuring Mary Steffel, professor at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University, fellow on the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team, and coauthor of the HBR article “How to Nudge Your Customers Without Pushing Them Away”.
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Complimentary Audio Webinar

Tuesday, January 31, 2017


12:00 PM - 1:00 PM US Eastern
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM US Central
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM US Mountain
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM US Pacific
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM GMT

Webinar Overview

Behavioral science is yielding important new insights about how consumers make decisions. Extensive research has shown that defaults are an effective way to nudge—but not force—consumers to act in a certain way. Defaults work because of people’s well-established bias for choosing default options. For example, defaults can nudge people to save for retirement by automatically enrolling them in a designated option unless they make an active decision to opt out. 

On January 31, in an interactive Harvard Business Review webinar, Northeastern University marketing professor Mary Steffel will share insights from her research on the power of defaults and how marketers and policymakers can leverage defaults to improve consumer well-being. She will also discuss the ethics of defaults and the roles and impact of disclosure and transparency. 

To learn how your company can nudge consumers to act in a certain way, and how you can do so in an ethical, transparent way, join Mary Steffel and HBR on January 31.


About the Speaker

Mary Steffel Assistant Professor of Marketing D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University  

Mary Steffel
Assistant Professor of Marketing

D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University

 

Mary Steffel is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from Princeton University in 2009 and her Ph.D. in marketing from the University of Florida in 2012. Her research is dedicated to the study of consumer judgment and decision-making. Her research examines when people call upon others to help them make decisions, what are the barriers to accurately gauging others’ preferences and effectively choosing on their behalf, and how to help people make better decisions for themselves and others.